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View Full Version : Do the Bush poll limbo: How low can he go?


Spence
06-21-2007, 01:18 PM
This one won't make Shally very happy:In the new poll, conducted Monday and Tuesday nights, President Bush’s approval rating has reached a record low. Only 26 percent of Americans, just over one in four, approve of the job the 43rd president is doing; while, a record 65 percent disapprove, including nearly a third of Republicans.
...
But the 26 percent rating puts Bush lower than Jimmy Carter, who sunk to his nadir of 28 percent in a Gallup poll in June 1979. In fact, the only president in the last 35 years to score lower than Bush is Richard Nixon. Nixon’s approval rating tumbled to 23 percent in January 1974, seven months before his resignation over the botched Watergate break-in.

The war in Iraq continues to drag Bush down. A record 73 percent of Americans disapprove of the job Bush has done handling Iraq. Despite “the surge” in U.S. forces into Baghdad and Iraq’s western Anbar province, a record-low 23 percent of Americans approve of the president’s actions in Iraq, down 5 points since the end of March.

But the White House cannot pin his rating on the war alone. Bush scores record or near record lows on every major issue...Source (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19352087/site/newsweek)

shally
06-21-2007, 01:47 PM
:cry:

not exactly unexpected..

but, i will try to find you a link to the USA poll i saw a couple of days ago that showed congress at 14% !!!! the lowest recorded number ever ..

as bad as bush is doing, it doesnt look like the congressional dems are doing much better

it is time for a viable 3rd party because people have truly had enough of tweedledum and tweedle-dummer

[url]www.blogs.usatoday.com/gallup...ooops. does not seem to be working too well. you can get to it via the usa today site and follow the prompts to the blog section.. sorry..

RedskinsDave
06-21-2007, 01:57 PM
Gas is under $3.00. This poll is ridiculous. :D

Ibleedburgundy
06-21-2007, 02:00 PM
I bet it's because some of the faithful are being peeled off by this immigration debacle.

shally
06-21-2007, 02:02 PM
I bet it's because some of the faithful are being peeled off by this immigration debacle.


bush fatigue as well..

enough is enough

Spence
06-21-2007, 02:02 PM
Actually, if you look at that Newsweek poll, you'll see Congress at 25%, just below Bush's 26% and with Dems disapproving about as much as Republicans and independents. Who can blame them? Record numbers of people think the country is on the wrong track and Congress can't do anything about it. They can't get Bush to agree to end the Iraq War. They can't get Bush to agree to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. They can't get Bush to agree to do almost anything the public wants to do. [And according to the polls, the public wants to do what the Dems want to do on almost every issue.] And with Bush's immigration bill fracturing the GOP and angering just about everyone from the left to the right and all points in between, the public is in a very sour mood these days.

All of which makes things look very nice for a candidate widely regarded as an agent of change. In other words, it is a good time to be Barack Obama. [Watch for him to beat everyone, including HRC, when the new fundraising numbers come out in early July.]

As for a viable 3rd party, I don't see one. The only independent who seems to have even the remotest chance of running a competitive presidential campaign is NYC Mayor/kajillionaire Michael Bloomberg. Be careful what you wish for, though. People who are not paying attention often mistake an independent for a centrist. In fact, Bloomberg is to the left of every single Democratic presidential candidate on almost every issue.

shally
06-21-2007, 02:11 PM
Actually, if you look at that Newsweek poll, you'll see Congress at 25%, just below Bush's 26% and with Dems disapproving about as much as Republicans and independents. Who can blame them? Record numbers of people think the country is on the wrong track and Congress can't do anything about it. They can't get Bush to agree to end the Iraq War. They can't get Bush to agree to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. They can't get Bush to agree to do almost anything the public wants to do. [And according to the polls, the public wants to do what the Dems want to do on almost every issue.] And with Bush's immigration bill fracturing the GOP and angering just about everyone from the left to the right and all points in between, the public is in a very sour mood these days.

All of which makes things look very nice for a candidate widely regarded as an agent of change. In other words, it is a good time to be Barack Obama. [Watch for him to beat everyone, including HRC, when the new fundraising numbers come out in early July.]

As for a viable 3rd party, I don't see one. The only independent who seems to have even the remotest chance of running a competitive presidential campaign is NYC Mayor/kajillionaire Michael Bloomberg. Be careful what you wish for, though. People who are not paying attention often mistake an independent for a centrist. In fact, Bloomberg is to the left of every single Democratic presidential candidate on almost every issue.

forget bloomberg...

i could support obama, and will if the gop nominates someone like brownback

the problem is that historically, this country has never supported 3rd parties for any length of time.. but if the conventions give us a choice of hillary and mccain the nausea level is gonna be unbearable...the selection process simply sucks

Patrick
06-21-2007, 02:17 PM
Actually, if you look at that Newsweek poll, you'll see Congress at 25%, just below Bush's 26% and with Dems disapproving about as much as Republicans and independents. Who can blame them? Record numbers of people think the country is on the wrong track and Congress can't do anything about it. They can't get Bush to agree to end the Iraq War. They can't get Bush to agree to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. They can't get Bush to agree to do almost anything the public wants to do. [And according to the polls, the public wants to do what the Dems want to do on almost every issue.] And with Bush's immigration bill fracturing the GOP and angering just about everyone from the left to the right and all points in between, the public is in a very sour mood these days.

All of which makes things look very nice for a candidate widely regarded as an agent of change. In other words, it is a good time to be Barack Obama. [Watch for him to beat everyone, including HRC, when the new fundraising numbers come out in early July.]

As for a viable 3rd party, I don't see one. The only independent who seems to have even the remotest chance of running a competitive presidential campaign is NYC Mayor/kajillionaire Michael Bloomberg. Be careful what you wish for, though. People who are not paying attention often mistake an independent for a centrist. In fact, Bloomberg is to the left of every single Democratic presidential candidate on almost every issue.

And Centrists who donít want any affiliation with either party often considers themselves an Independent Ė regardless what the so-called self-proclaimed political experts label them. ...........;)

shally
06-21-2007, 02:19 PM
And Centrists who donít want any affiliation with either party often considers themselves an Independent Ė regardless what the so-called self-proclaimed political experts label them. ...........;)

i think they are just being disingenuous and know exactly where they fit in but refuse to say or call themselves independents just to confound pollsters

Spence
06-21-2007, 02:25 PM
forget bloomberg...Concur.

i could support obama, and will if the gop nominates someone like brownback

the problem is that historically, this country has never supported 3rd parties for any length of time.. but if the conventions give us a choice of hillary and mccain the nausea level is gonna be unbearable...the selection process simply sucks
Concur. Historically, what happens with 3rd parties that rise to prominence is that they do so over a single issue, such as the budget deficit and Ross Perot in 1992. It's normally an issue that both parties have ignored because they're both to blame for it -- like the budget deficit. Then, one or both of the two major parties, alarmed by the rise of a 3rd party, co-opt the third party's issue and the air goes out of the independent bubble. That's what happened with the budget deficit after 1992 and that's why Perot went from 19% in 1992 to 8% in 1996.

shally
06-21-2007, 02:38 PM
Concur.


Concur. Historically, what happens with 3rd parties that rise to prominence is that they do so over a single issue, such as the budget deficit and Ross Perot in 1992. It's normally an issue that both parties have ignored because they're both to blame for it -- like the budget deficit. Then, one or both of the two major parties, alarmed by the rise of a 3rd party, co-opt the third party's issue and the air goes out of the independent bubble. That's what happened with the budget deficit after 1992 and that's why Perot went from 19% in 1992 to 8% in 1996.

also because people began to realize that perot was simply F***** nuts

Spence
06-21-2007, 02:46 PM
also because people began to realize that perot was simply F***** nutsWhen he chose "Crazy" as his campaign theme song, it became clear he had decided not to deny the obvious and just make a flat-out appeal for votes to the mentally ill.

shally
06-22-2007, 12:19 AM
When he chose "Crazy" as his campaign theme song, it became clear he had decided not to deny the obvious and just make a flat-out appeal for votes to the mentally ill.

had the same result as when dole appealed to the E.D. segment of the population

Spence
06-22-2007, 09:04 AM
Over two out-of-three Americans say they disapprove of the way George W. Bush is handling his job as president according to the latest survey from the American Research Group.
...
Overall, 27% of Americans say that they approve of the way George W. Bush is handling his job as president, 67% disapprove, and 6% are undecided.

Among Republicans (31% of adults registered to vote in the survey), 62% approve of the way Bush is handling his job and 31% disapprove. Among Democrats (36% of adults registered to vote in the survey), 7% approve and 88% disapprove of the way Bush is handling his job. Among independents (33% of adults registered to vote in the survey), 19% approve and 76% disapprove of the way Bush is handling his job as president.Source (http://americanresearchgroup.com/economy/)

shally
06-22-2007, 09:11 AM
Source (http://americanresearchgroup.com/economy/)

bush-fatigue